NIFT MFM Communication Ability & English Comprehension Questions and Answers

NIFT MFM Communication Ability & English Comprehension Questions and Answers

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NIFT MFM Communication Ability & English Comprehension Questions and Answers

1. Directions (1 to 2): In the following question, there is a certain relationship between the two terms on each side of : : Find the missing term so that both the pairs share a similar relationship.

Q. Anaemia : Blood : : Anarchy : ?

2. Q. Umpire : Game : : ? : ?

3. Direction (3 to 6): Although websites such as Facebook and MySpace experienced exponential growth during the middle of the first decade of the 21st century, some users remain oblivious to the fact that the information they post online can come back to haunt them. First, employers can monitor employees who maintain a blog, photo diary, or website. Employers can look for controversial employee opinions, sensitive information disclosures, or wildly inappropriate conduct. For example, a North Carolina newspaper fired one of its features writers after she created a blog on which she anonymously wrote about the idiosyncrasies of her job and coworkers.

The second unintended use of information from social networking websites is employers who check on prospective employees. A June 11, 2006 New York Times article reported that many companies recruiting on college campuses use search engines and social networking websites such as MySpace, Xanga, and Facebook to conduct background checks. Although the use of MySpace or Google to scrutinize a student’s background is somewhat unsettling to many undergraduates, the Times noted that the utilization of Facebook is especially shocking to students who believe that Facebook is limited to current students and recent alumni.

Corporate recruiters and prospective employers are not the only people interested in college students’ lives. The third unintended use of social networking websites is college administrators who monitor the Internet—especially Facebook—for student misconduct. For example, a college in Boston’s Back Bay expelled its student Government Association President for joining a Facebook group highly critical of a campus police sergeant. In addition, fifteen students at a state university in North Carolina faced charges in court for underage drinking because of photos that appeared on Facebook.

Although more users of websites such as Facebook are becoming aware of the potential pitfalls of online identities, many regular users still fail to take three basic security precautions. First, only make your information available to a specific list of individuals whom you approve. Second, regularly search for potentially harmful information about yourself that may have been posted by mistake or by a disgruntled former associate. Third, never post blatantly offensive material under your name or on your page as, despite the best precautions, this material will likely make its way to the wider world. By taking these simple steps, members of the digital world can realize the many benefits of e-community without experiencing some of the damaging unintended consequences.


Q. Based upon the passage, the author implies which of the following:

4. Q. The author implies that users should take all of the following actions to protect their online privacy EXCEPT:

5. Q. The tone of the passage suggests that the author's view toward e-community and the digital world can best be described as:

6. Q. According to the passage, all of the following represent a possible threat to privacy or an unintended use of data EXCEPT:

7. Directions (7 to 9): Choose one word from the alternatives to replace the phrase given below.

Q. One who is skilled in feats of balance and agility in gymnastics

8. Q. Design made by putting together coloured pieces of glass or stones

9. Q. A person who possesses qualities of both introversion and extroversion

10. Direction (10 to 14): Although European decisions during the 16th and 17th centuries to explore, trade with, and colonize large portions of the world brought tremendous economic wealth and vast geographic influence, the enormous success of European maritime ventures during the age of exploration also engendered a litany of unintended consequences for most of the nations with which Europe interacted. Due to their incredible military force, religious zeal, and uncompromising goal of profit, Europeans often imposed their traditions, values, and customs on the people with whom they traded. They frequently acted without regard to the long-term welfare of others as their principal concern was short-term economic gain. Since many nations that traded with Europe placed high value on their historical customs, some natives became deeply disconcerted by the changes that occurred as a result of European power. These factors, coupled with perennial domestic political instability, caused numerous countries to grow increasingly resistant to European influence.

One potent example of this ideological shift can be seen in the actions of the Tokugawa government of Japan. In its Seclusion Edict of 1636, the government attempted to extricate cultural interactions with Europe from the intimate fabric of Japanese society. The Edict attempted to accomplish this by focusing on three areas. First, it sought to curb cultural exchange by eliminating people bringing European ideas into Japan. The Edict stated, "Japanese ships shall by no means be sent abroad….All Japanese residing abroad shall be put to death when they return home." Second, the Edict focused on limiting trade. Articles 11 through 17 of the Edict imposed stringent regulations on trade and commerce. Third, the government banned Christianity, which it saw as an import from Europe that challenged the long-established and well-enshrined religious traditions of Japan. The government went to considerable lengths to protect its culture. Article eight of the Edict stated, "Even ships shall not be left untouched in the matter of exterminating Christians."

With the example of Japan and the examples of other countries that chose a different response to European influence, it is perhaps not too far of a stretch to conclude that Japan made the right decision in pursuing a path of relative isolationism. As history unfolded during the next 400 years, in general, countries that embraced European hegemony, whether by choice or by force, tended to suffer from pernicious wealth inequality, perennial political instability, and protracted underdevelopment.

Q. Based upon the passage, the author would likely agree most strongly with which of the following statements:


11. Q. Which of the following best characterizes the most significant motivation for Europe's behavior with Japan during the 17th century?

12. Q. The author most likely included the quotation from Article Eight of the Edict at the end of the second paragraph to:

13. Q. It can best be inferred from the passage that in 1636, the Japanese government:

14. Q. According to the passage, which of the following constituted the biggest reason for the Seclusion Edict of 1636?

15. Directions: Pick out the opposite word for the given word.

Q. Dull

16. Directions: Pick the odd one out.

17. Directions: Choose the option that best expresses the meaning of the idiom which is underlined.

Q. Richard would give his right arm to own a house like his.

18. Directions (18 to 19): Choose the best option to fill in the blank.

Q. Clothes ____ jeans and t-shirts are my favourite casual wears.

19. Q. If only I ______ his address, I would most certainly have told you.

20. Directions: Choose one word that substitutes the given phrase.

Q. A list of explanation of words, especially unusual ones at the end of a book

21. Directions: Choose the alternative that explains the given idiomatic expression.

Q. To tempt providence

22. Directions: Pick the odd one out

23. Which of the following spelling incorrect in the given context ?

24. Direction (24 to 27): In each of the question given below a/an idiom/phrase is given in bold which is then followed by five options which then try to decipher its meaning. Choose the option which gives the correct meaning of the phrases.

Q. To bring one’s egg to a bad market

25. Q. To spill the beans

26. Q. Will o’ the wisp


27. Q. To get cold feet

28. Directions: Select the word that is antonymous to the given word.

Q. Gloat

29. Directions (29 to 30): The question has a pair of CAPITALISED words followed by other pairs of words. Choose the pair of words which best expresses the relationship similar to that expressed in the capitalised pair.

Q. HYMN : PRAISE


30. Q. CHARY : CAUTION

31. Directions: Identify the part having an error. If there is no error, then mark (4) as your answer.

32. Directions (32 to 33): In the following sentence, there are two blank spaces. Below the sentence are given four pairs of words. Find out which pair of words can be used to fill in the blanks in the same sequence to make the sentence meaningfully complete.

Q. A more _______ strategy to _______ away from its reliance on diamonds is to attract more tourists.

33. Q. In her interviews and emails, she is prickly and cautious, as though __________ incursions into the worlds she has __________ her readers.

34. Directions: Choose the alternative that explains the given idiomatic expression.

Q. To shed crocodile tears

35. Directions: Choose the option that best expresses the meaning of the idiom.

Q. To be in two minds

36. Which of the following spelling incorrect in the given context ?

37. Directions: Choose the option that best expresses the meaning of the idiom which is underlined.

Q. Diana took to swimming like a duck to water even before she was 3 years old.

38. Directions: Identify the part having an error. If there is no error, then mark (4) as your answer.

39. In the following the questions choose the word which best expresses the meaning of the given word

Q. Contingent

40. Which of the following spelling incorrect in the given context ?

41. Directions: Identify the part having an error. If there is no error, then mark (4) as your answer.

42. Direction (42 to 46): Shortly after September 11, 2001, the United States began requesting additional financial information about persons of interest by subpoenaing records located at the SWIFT banking consortium. SWIFT, which routes trillions of dollars a day, faced an ethical dilemma: fight the subpoenas in order to protect member privacy and the group's reputation for the highest level of confidentiality, or, comply and provide information about thousands of financial communications in the hope that lives will be saved. SWIFT decided to comply in secret, but in late June 2006, four major U.S. newspapers disclosed SWIFT's compliance. This sparked a heated public debate over the ethics of SWIFT's decision to reveal ostensibly confidential financial communications.

Analyzing the situation in hindsight, three ethical justifications existed for not complying with the Treasury Department's requests. First, SWIFT needed to uphold its long-standing values of confidentiality, non-disclosure, and institutional trust. The second ethical reason against SWIFT's involvement came with inadequate government oversight as the Treasury Department failed to construct necessary safeguards to ensure the privacy of the data. Third, international law must be upheld and one could argue quite strongly that the government's use of data breached some parts of international law.

Although SWIFT executives undoubtedly considered the aforementioned reasons for rejecting the government's subpoena, three ethical justifications for complying existed. First, it could be argued that the program was legal because the United States government possesses the authority to subpoena records stored within its territory and SWIFT maintained many of its records in Virginia. Second, it is entirely possible that complying with the government's subpoena thwarted another catastrophic terrorist attack that would have cost lives and dollars. Third, cooperating with the government did not explicitly violate any SWIFT policies due to the presence of a valid subpoena. However, the extent of cooperation certainly surprised many financial institutions and sparked some outrage and debate within the financial community.

While SWIFT had compelling arguments both for agreeing and refusing to cooperate with the U.S. government program, even in hindsight, it is impossible to judge with certitude the wisdom and ethics of SWIFT's decision to cooperate as we still lack answers to important questions such as: what information did the government want? What promises did the government make about data confidentially? What, if any, potentially impending threats did the government present to justify its need for data?

Q. The author suggests which of the following is the most appropriate conclusion of an analysis of the ethics of SWIFT's decision?

43. Q. Which of the following can be inferred from the passage?

44. Q. The author implies that which of the following most likely occurred as a result of the news stories that ran in June 2006:

45. Q. According to the passage, each of the following describes SWIFT EXCEPT:

46. Q. Inferring from the passage, which of the following constituted an ethical justification for SWIFT complying with the government?

47. Which of the following spelling incorrect in the given context ?

48. Which of the following spelling incorrect in the given context ?


49. Directions (49 to 50): In the following sentence, there are two blank spaces. Below the sentence are given four pairs of words. Find out which pair of words can be used to fill in the blanks in the same sequence to make the sentence meaningfully complete.

Q. A more _______ strategy to _______ away from its reliance on diamonds is to attract more tourists.

50. Q. In her interviews and emails, she is prickly and cautious, as though __________ incursions into the worlds she has __________ her readers.